Poor lighting in hotels may lead to serious falls

| Aug 28, 2020 | Premises Liability

The heavy flow of guests into New York hotels makes it critical that hotel owners make their establishments as safe as possible. Sometimes it does not take much more than installing the proper lighting inside a hotel and outside in parking lots and walkways to prevent someone from falling down. Unfortunately, some property owners fail to take this common sense step. 

FindLaw points out that property owners who understand their properties do not possess adequate light and yet do nothing about it could face liability suits in court. Due to the heavy foot traffic of guests, hotels have a number of reasons to put up proper lighting. 

Shining the light on trip hazards

Trip hazards can show up anywhere. Hotel guests need light in parking lots during the evening to avoid tripping over cracks and uneven pavement. Hotel halls, rooms and passages require adequate light to help guests safely navigate. Without the right level of light, a guest can trip and fall down stairs, trip over poorly maintained carpet, or collide with various obstacles like cabinets and dressers that one may find in a hotel room. 

Helping guests avoid clutter

Hotels should also keep their halls and passages free of clutter. In the event a hotel staff cannot avoid obstructing part of a passage, hotel patrons should have good lighting to see and avoid them. Without proper light, a guest cannot spot any number of hazards that can cause a fall, like a luggage cart, a food cart, boxes, power cords, or a slippery floor. 

Proper light can help seniors

Keeping a hotel well lit is even more crucial when it comes to older guests. Aging.com explains that many seniors suffer falls because of physical limitations or vision problems. Simply having the proper lighting may help a senior spot physical obstacles and avoid them before it is too late. 

Additionally, hotels should be careful not to flood their rooms or halls with light that is too bright or produces a painful glare. Bright lights in a hall or a room can keep a person from discerning possible hazards and could also trigger dizziness in older people or individuals with medical conditions.